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in tahrir square-- familiar scenes in egypt nearly two years ago that led to the fall of longtime leader hosni mubark. but today, they were aimed at egypt's new leader. in the coastal city of alexandria, opponents set fire to the offices of president mohammed morsi's political party, the muslim brotherhood. there and elsewhere in egypt today, the president's critics and supporters clashed in the streets over his decree yesterday exempting himself from judicial review, and giving him authority to take steps against "threats to the revolution." morsi, egypt's first freely elected president, took office in june. in recent days, he'd garnered worldwide praise for mediating a cease-fire between israel and hamas. today, he told a supportive crowd outside the presidential palace in cairo that granting himself sweeping powers was necessary to prevent figures from the old regime from halting progress. >> ( translated ): i haven't taken a decision to use it against anyone-- to go against anyone is something that i could never be associated with-- or announcing that i am biased towards anyone. howe
. these were things that were going to be discussed. as long as the cease-fire held, egypt being the keeper of the cease-fire, and a senior israeli diplomat told me that they were very glad to see that egypt was filling that role again, mubarak's regime filled the role when he was in power, and they were worried that president morsi was not going to be able to do that because he's more aligned with hamas because he's aligned with the muslim brotherhood. so they're quite happy to see that at least egypt is sort of there, supposed to be the keeper of the peace for the time being. but it is worrying that we're seeing an incident so quickly after the cease-fire was put in place. and a lot of concerns that if this sort of thing starts happening again, there's always incidents along that israel/gaza border that the cease-fire will mean nothing in the next few days. >> sara sidner live for us in jerusalem. as always, thank you. >> i want to bring in stuart holliday the former u.s. ambassador for special political affairs to the united nations. he's currently the president and ceo of the meridian i
, not a phenomenon. the era of egypt and the region has changed, and america has now beginning to learn a new and listen to a new language. >> so is he right? is there a new era dawning in the middle east? and what does it mean for the u.s.? >> well, there's clearly a new era dawning in the middle east. and we're still trying to figure out what the new order is going to look like, as are many people on the ground. but both sides to a certain degree can claim a degree of victory here. hamas survived and it can never win militarily. but it can -- it -- its survival means that it won to a certain extent. that's the model created in the war between israel and hezbollah in neighboring lebanon. but israel also made significant gains out of this. it proved that its iron dome missile defense system could protect vast areas and could shoot down the majority of hamas rockets. and one of the things it's going to get out of this from the united states is additional help in providing more missiles for iron dome so that it has even a greater range of protection. so the dynamics are changing a little bit on
on this friday, november 23, 2012. we begin overseas. the cease-fire between hamas and israel has held. in egypt, president mohamed morsi showed his authority yesterday. a startling port grab, freeing himself from traditional oversight. president obama followed through on an annual tradition of calling 10 service members to personally thank them for their service. the washington times and the new york times reporting there are now more state capitols dominated by a single party that than at any time since 1952. the washington times question, is this the answer, secure for gridlock? we'll get your answers. send us a tweet or post your comments on facebook. also, you can e-mail us. we will begin with the front page of the washington times for our question for all new this morning, there headline -- do you think this could be a cure for gridlock? the new york times also has this headline this morning -- we want to hear from you this morning. let me give you the phone numbers again. how did you vote in the last election? did you vote with the intention of one-party rule in your state legislature? wh
the librarian in alexandria, egypt, for instance. i hope i am not mangling his name to badly. roughly measure the world with not much more than, you know, a calendar and the sun and the big stick in the ground. and when you see that extraordinary sense of developing knowledge about the natural world, that comes out of your curiosity, that is what i think i'm talking about when i talk about kids natural curiosity and how we have to keep telling the stories to fire up their imagination and creativity. >> host: zero contrarian tweet sent to you, these days history class is tend to focus almost exclusively on the underrepresented groups mentioned. do we spend -- are we to eurocentric? to spend too much time on the magellan and columbus? >> tina, that's a good question. i think it has been somewhat addressed. some people think that it has swung too far. i know, for instance, there were some concerns a few years ago that there were history standards coming out that did not mention robert e. lee. on the other hand, there are the texas state textbooks which have been the subject -- subject of some co
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5